I suspected it was a tad too quiet on this file …

The federal government has blown its own timeline to unveil an update to Canada’s corporate-misconduct provisions , including changes that could help SNC-Lavalin avoid being barred from lucrative federal contracts.

An internal federal document obtained by The Canadian Press shows the Liberal government was planning to announce a long-studied revision to its so-called “ integrity regime ” in early February.

I find it more than ‘ odd ‘ that the board of SNC Lavalin would be involved in the ‘ revision ‘ of a so called ‘ integrity regime ‘ ! …

“ The integrity regime’s updated ineligibility and suspension policy will be published in early February 2019 , and will come into effect at the end of February 2019 ” said information contained in a Feb. 4 email to an associate deputy minister. The email was released under access-to-information law.

Three months later , the government has yet to publish the integrity-regime update , nor has it responded to requests to explain the reason for the delay.

I was wondering what’s been happening with this … It’s been … Shall I say … Oddly quiet , to say the least … At first I thought that Junior and Lametti had managed to sneak a sweetheart deal behind our backs … But it appears to be stalled …

Later on int the June / 1 article it goes on to state …

David Lametti , who replaced Wilson-Raybould as justice minister and attorney general , acknowledged Wednesday in response to reporters’ questions that a deferred-prosecution agreement with SNC-Lavalin remains a possibility. He declined to comment further , saying the case was before the courts …

Translation ; ” We’re still trying to figure out how we can buy KBec votes and at the same time not lose votes everywhere else in the country by allowing this KBec Korruption to carry on , business as usual “The whole story is quite  interesting …

I then found a more recent article , June / 6 , by Andy MacDougall , of Maclean’s magazine , putting the whole thing into the perspective more in tune with my thinking on the situation …

( Andrew MacDougall is a London ( UK ) based columnist, commentator and consultant. He was formerly Director of Communications to Stephen Harper )

Here’s a few snippets from it … Hit the link for the whole , very interesting ‘ political  ‘ take that Andy puts forth …

Has the pressure suddenly eased on SNC ? Was the pressure never really there ? Or is it just too politically unpalatable to pick the SNC scab at this particular point in time ?…

Given a federal judge has just said SNC must stand trial for corruption , and that a conviction would limit the company’s ability to pick up valuable contracts with the Canadian government—contracts the company says it needs—all signs point to timing being the problem.

And while there is still a chance the Trudeau government might not grant the DPA , it stands to reason it would have ruled it out earlier in the year if that was the case , whether at the time of Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott’s expulsion from caucus, or following last month’s ruling by the federal judge. After all , why leave a toxic loose end dangling ?…

But it hasn’t yet drawn the line. A DPA for SNC remains on the table. So , if not grant the DPA now , when ?…

The government isn’t showing any of its cards. A spokesman for the justice minister would say only that “ nothing has changed ” re: SNC , before referring to Justice Minister David Lametti’s say-nothing statement following last month’s federal ruling. Legally, Lametti can offer a DPA until there is a verdict in the case.

It could be the government is waiting for the summer recess of the House of Commons so as to avoid the grilling from the opposition on a get-out-of-jail-for-a-fee card for SNC. Without the daily storm in the House the opposition would face a much bigger challenge keeping the story alive over the summer.

Alternatively , the government might actually be following some sort of rules-based process or assessment of the SNC situation , albeit one it hasn’t deigned to share with Canadians. Trudeau and his office were big—for a time , anyway—on seeking the counsel of someone like former Supreme Court Justice Beverley McLachlin on the matter. That said , surely six months is plenty of time for the new attorney general to have formed his opinion completely and utterly free and independent from the rest of government ( cough ) ?…

One thing is clear : SNC doesn’t appear to be pressing its case anymore. The past few years might have featured dozens upon dozens of interactions between SNC and the government but, according to the lobbying registry , there have been zero contacts between SNC and the government on “ Justice and Law Enforcement ” since January of this year , i.e. before the SNC hit the fan on the front page of the Globe and Mail.

The relative silence from all sides suggests the company knows not to ask until November of this year , when the court process will still be ongoing. One suspects that if Trudeau is returned that DPA is as good as gold.

Ya gotta read the whole thing … But I’ll close with Andy’s final statement … One that I’ve had a suspicion of during this period of ‘ too quiet ‘…

The relative silence from all sides suggests the company knows not to ask until November of this year , when the court process will still be ongoing. One suspects that if Trudeau is returned that DPA is as good as gold …

I’m VERY surprised ! … But GOOD !!! …

The front on this one has been somewhat quiet for a few weeks .. No doubt overshadowed by our neighbours to the south … However …

SNC-Lavalin will stand trial on criminal corruption charges linked to its alleged business activities in Libya under former dictator Moammar Gaddafi.

A KBec judge ( Amazingly enough !!! ) ruled Wednesday morning that prosecutors have enough evidence to sustain a trial of the Montreal engineering giant , which stands accused of fraud and bribing Libyan officials between 2001 and 2011 to get contracts.

The evidence is under a publication ban.

If convicted , the company could face being barred for up to 10 years from bidding on government contracts …

Trudeau’s ‘hidden agenda’ exposed …

This will be the last one in this category …

The Liberal government he presided over was , in the unforgettable words of Marie Henein — Vice-Admiral Mark Norman’s lawyer — attempting to put a finger on the scales of justice …

Not once, but twice— that we know of —  ( Vice-Admiral Mark Norman ) as the SNC-Lavalin scandal demonstrated the same thing …

That is , a prime minister and a prime minister’s office was either unfamiliar with , or uncaring about , such fundamental legal concepts as prosecutorial independence and the timely disclosure of relevant evidence to the accused in a criminal trial.

While we may never know the full story — with the Liberals using their majority to shut down a parliamentary or public inquiry into the Norman case , just as they shut down the parliamentary inquiry into Lavscam prematurely — we know enough to know this ..

.It may not have risen in either case to obstruction of justice — Wilson-Raybould herself testified she didn’t think Trudeau and Co. crossed that red line in Lavscam.

But what it has done is to offend the sense of right and wrong of fair-minded Canadians , as indicated by polls showing Trudeau’s credibility has been severely damaged, along with that of the Liberal party , ironically from self-inflicted wounds.

What it means is that the coming federal election on Oct. 21 is going to be, as Trudeau predicted, one of the dirtiest in Canadian political history..

And on that note … Since ( as Lorrie Goldstein of the Toronto Sun states … )Trudeau and his Liberals have managed to bury that now by squashing any attempts to investigate the matter further … I’ll close out my ‘ Junior & SNC Saga ‘ category and replace it with a new ‘ The Lame Brain Campaign / Election 2019 ‘…

That’s where the title stands at the moment ( just now … Off the top of my head ! ) … When I get into Photshop I may come up with something else …

Let’s see ya ‘ spar ‘ with this one Junior !!! …

Fortunately Vice-Admiral Norman didn’t fire the females he hired …

You see the phrase ‘ political performance ’ a lot in this business. But the truth is , most politicians , even good ones , can’t perform worth a damn. They’re hams , most of them , by necessity. In politics , nuance doesn’t sell.

That’s what made what Marie Henein did Wednesday so remarkable. For more than 30 minutes , she performed in the truest sense. She put on a piece of political theatre — complete with shrugs , half smiles and quiet asides — that was as understated as it was devastating.

“ Before we get started ” she began , “ I’d just like to introduce the ” — at this point she paused for half a beat and allowed herself the slightest smile — “ all female team that represented Vice-Admiral Norman ”… She delivered her next line in a stone-faced deadpan. “ Fortunately Vice-Admiral Norman didn’t fire the females he hired ”…

You can almost hear the loud hi-hat snap from Doc Sev’s drummer directly after the last word of that sentence !!! …

The reference to Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott could not have been clearer if it was stencilled in red paint on a white wall in letters a hundred metres tall !!! …

Henein was speaking to reporters Wednesday after the charges against her client , Vice-Admiral Mark Norman , were stayed in a surprise court appearance. The prosecutor told the court that , after reviewing new evidence , the Crown no longer felt it had a reasonable chance of obtaining a conviction in the case.

The decision was a massive win for Henein and her client. The politically-charged case against Norman — he was accused of leaking confidential material related to a ship building contract — had come to centre in the public eye , like the SNC affair , around an accusation of political interference in a high-profile prosecution.

Some , ‘ Oh so familiar ‘ , aspects to the case ;

She blamed the Prime Minister’s Office and the Privy Council Office collectively for withholding a host of documents …

Concerns when anyone tries to erode the resilience of the justice system …

“ There are times you agree with what happens in a court room there are times you don’t … And that’s fine … But what you don’t do is you don’t put your finger forward and try to weigh in on the scales of justice “…

The SNC-Lavalin affair has come to define the later part of Trudeau’s tenure in office. And on Wednesday , Henein kept the focus on Trudeau , and his brand , from the moment she sat down.

But Henein was far from finished. Again and again , she hammered in references to the SNC-Lavalin affair without ever making them direct …

“ The decision to stay this prosecution ” she said , “ was discretion exercised by prosecutors and the ( Director of Public Prosecutions ), unimpacted by any political considerations, as it should be ”…

OOOooh !!! … OUCH !!! … Even I would be a tad apprehensive about gettin’ into back and forth barbfest with this crafty ( and clever ! ) witch !!! … ( And I state that in a sincere complimentary fashion ) …

She delivered that last line with a staccato flair , underlining each word as a separate sentence. She slipped in the next one , the most devastating one , as a casual aside … “ That is in fact how things are supposed to work ” she said … “ Politics are supposed to stay out of the prosecutorial process ”…

Ya got that Junior ?!!! … Earth to Junior !!! … COME IN JUNIOR ! … Well , no … Actually … GET OUT JUNIOR !!! … Time to go !!! … November is only months away !!! …

Source: National Post

The big fat ghost of the Duffster haunts Junior now …

OTTAWA — The Senate is still debating whether or not to invite former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould to testify about the SNC-Lavalin affair and at least one senator wants former prime minister Stephen Harper to show up, too.

In a new twist to the weeks-long deliberations Thursday evening, one senator proposed expanding a committee study to discuss inappropriate interference by the Prime Minister’s Office in general, and inviting witnesses, including Harper and former aide Nigel Wright, to be questioned about the scandal around Sen. Mike Duffy, who still sits in the Senate.

It was yet another sign that tensions in an independent-majority upper chamber, where newer members are preoccupied by snuffing out partisanship, are starting to boil over.

Sen. Pierrette Ringuette, formerly a Liberal senator who is now part of the Independent Senators Group, proposed amending Conservative Sen. Don Plett’s motion, seeking to invite Wilson-Raybould to talk to the Senate legal committee, with a list of witnesses “with potential experience in past matters of alleged political interference, direction and pressure on parliamentarians and their work in the Office of the Prime Minister.” The list names Harper, three of his former top staff and several Conservative senators past and present.

Plett promptly accused her of trying to “make a mockery” out of a serious issue. “I am astounded, flabbergasted and offended,” he said, before debate was adjourned for the night.

After being shuffled from justice in January and resigning from cabinet in February, Wilson-Raybould testified at the House of Commons justice committee that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tried to inappropriately interfere in the criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin for political reasons — and that she suspected her decision not to bow to that pressure was the reason she lost the attorney general job. After the Liberal majority on that committee cut its investigation into the issue short, Conservatives in the Senate have argued there is unfinished business to complete.

They have also argued that if independent senators appointed by Trudeau are really independent, they will allow further study. As Plett put it Thursday evening, “If senators opposite vote against the motion that is before us, I submit they will be the ones in this chamber who are demonstrating blatant partisanship, partisanship on behalf of the current government.”

In the preamble to her amendment Ringuette noted that in Wilson-Raybould’s subsequent brief to the committee, which included an audio file that corroborated her earlier testimony, the former minister said, “I do not believe I have anything further to offer a formal process regarding this specific matter.”

“If anything, I find myself surprised by the outreach displayed by the members opposite. After all, PMO pressure on the Conservative government caucus of the Senate during the last Parliament is well documented,” Ringuette said, before reading from an Ontario Court of Justice decision that acquitted Sen. Mike Duffy of criminal charges in 2016.

Duffy had been caught in a scandal over whether he was a “primary” resident of the province he represented, Prince Edward Island, and over a $90,000 cheque Wright offered him to cover living expenses that Harper had ordered him to pay back to the Senate. Although the senator himself was cleared, the judge slammed the then-PMO’s “political, covert, relentless” puppeteering in the Senate as “mind boggling and shocking” and “unacceptable in a democratic society.”

“Perhaps the Senate ought to exercise some sober second thought on this matter as well. It never did. After all, what is good for the goose is also good for the gander,” Ringuette said.

Another independent senator tried to adjourn debate, but not before Plett got his reaction on the record.

“I’m not very often at a complete loss for words,” he began. “I think it is shameful that we would make such a mockery out of such a serious situation where Canadians have been cheated, where a prime minister is under investigation … where ministers have come down, condemning this prime minister and his government. Then for someone to bring people back from five and six and 10 years ago as if this is an amendment.”

Senators will have to deal with the amendment before they can decide on the original motion. Time is running out; Plett’s motion calls for a report by June 15. Meanwhile, more debate has yet to happen on a different motion from independent senator André Pratte. It seeks a special committee study on issues around the SNC-Lavalin affair, with a June 1 deadline, but stops short of inviting Wilson-Raybould herself.

Source: Ghost of Mike Duffy

Liberals accused of SNC-Lavalin illegal donation cover-up …

OTTAWA — Conservatives accused Liberals of a different sort of SNC-Lavalin cover-up in question period Tuesday after a report revealed the names of employees involved in the Montreal firm’s illegal attempts to influence Canadian politics between 2004 and 2011.

A CBC investigation revealed new details about the scheme and listed for the first time individuals accused of indirectly funnelling almost $110,000 of the company’s money to the Liberal Party , and another $8,000 to the Conservative Party. The parties became aware of the lists during a 2016 investigation by the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

CBC’s The Fifth Estate reported that it obtained the names from a leaked confidential document , which Côté had sent to the Liberal Party in 2016. It lists 18 former SNC-Lavalin employees or their spouses who donated almost $110,000 to Liberal Party riding associations and leadership campaigns. The commissioner’s investigation revealed the company reimbursed the donors , which is illegal.

SNC-Lavalin also made about $8,000 worth of contributions to the Conservative Party in this way , as recently as 2011. Since 2004 it has been illegal for corporations to donate to federal parties at all.

In the compliance agreement with the commissioner in 2016, the company agreed not to break the law again. Lists of names went to the Liberals and Conservatives so they could reimburse the receiver general for the associated donations , which both did. CBC reported that Tories provided the names when asked, but Liberals repeatedly refused.

The compliance agreement itself , which is available on the commissioner’s website, states that SNC-Lavalin implemented compliance measures and mechanisms as recommended by elections officials. But it did not preclude individuals from being charged as a result of the then-ongoing investigation. One former SNC-Lavalin vice president was ultimately charged for the breaches in May 2018. Normand Morin pled guilty to two violations of the Canada Elections Act in November, for “ collusion ” with senior executives on behalf of political parties, and paid a $2,000 fine.

In 2014, Tory MP Dean Del Mastro faced criminal prosecution and served jail time for financial violations of the Elections Act that involved considerably less money.

“ It just boggles the mind that the so-called watchdog of elections would not have taken the ( SNC ) matter to court and prosecuted that offence ” Pierre Poilievre told reporters after question period. “ It’s insane. He’s got a lot of explaining to do.”

Just like Trump is sorting out the Deep State Swamp down south … We need to elect someone this coming November to deal with this Deep Province bullshit up here …

Source: Liberals accused of cover-up after report reveals details of SNC-Lavalin’s illegal donations | National Post